Campus Dialogue on Race

November 1 – November 8, 2013

Join the Campus Dialogue on Race Planning Committee

Meetings held every Tuesday from 1 to 2 p.m. in the Library Fish Bowl (Lib. Room 209)

Tim'm West

With Keynote Speaker Tim'm West

Deconstructing Dis/ease: The Body as a politicized site for healing self and community.

Monday, Nov. 4
6:30 - 8 p.m.
Gist Hall Theatre

Tim'm T. West is a poet, scholar, rapper, and youth activist who was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, and raised primarily in rural Arkansas. A contemporary Renaissance man, he is a featured voice in many documentaries about hip hop and masculinity because of his ground-breaking work as a gay-identified hip hop artist, AIDS activist, and youth advocate, among other affiliations. A teacher and cultural producer at a number of secondary and post-secondary institutions, as well as a former varsity basketball coach, West has a B.A. from Duke University and graduate degrees from The New School for Social Research and Stanford University. He is author of several books (Red Dirt Revival: a poetic memoir in 6 Breaths, BARE: notes from a porchdweller, Flirting, and the forthcoming pre|dispositions), is widely anthologized, and also has produced and released nine hip hop albums, the first several with iconic queer rap group D/DC. In 2013 he released his fifth solo project, snapshots. Tim'm West travels and lectures widely and, professionally, serves as Director of Youth Programs at Center On Halsted in Chicago.

For more information contact
Kumi Watanabe-Schock
707.826.5656
kumi.watanabe-schock@humboldt.edu


Downloads:

Event Poster
Event Program

The theme of the 2013 Campus Dialogue on Race is “(In)Justice and Resistance: Past, Present and Potential.”

This theme encompasses the following:

*Body Justice offers a positive framing that speaks to a history of resistance and asks us to think about justice in a new way. “Body” helps us think about what systemic changes we need to liberate all of our bodies, and it calls to mind multiple intersecting systems of oppression in the context of resistance.

About the Campus Dialogue On Race

(In)Justice and Resistance: Past, Present and Potential and this theme encompasses Body Justice, Racism in a "Post-Racial" Society, Justice for Trayvon(s): Stand Whose Ground? and many others. Fill out the 2013 CDOR Proposal Form before 10/7, if you'd like to offer a workshop, film screenings and other events.

Events Schedule

Room Abbreviations: GF – Goodwin Forum (Nelson Hall East 102); GH – Gist Hall; SciA – Science A; SH – Siemens Hall.

Ongoing (Tuesday, Oct. 29 to Monday, Nov. 11)

CouRaGeouS Club Exhibit
Library Display Case

Friday, Nov. 1

Dia de los Muertos
10am – Noon
Testimonios as a Call to Action, Library Fishbowl (Lib. Room 209)

3 p.m.
Fight for Environmental Equality and Justice (SH 108)

Dia de los Muertos, Altar Presentation (Karshner Lounge, UC)

6 p.m.
Dia de los Muertos Event (Native Forum)

"Fruitvale Station" opens at Broadway Cinema, Eureka

Saturday, Nov. 2

Dia de los Muertos

Monday, Nov. 4

1 – 2:30 p.m.
Poet and hip hop artist Tim’m West Reading/Q & A/Book Release Party (Library Fishbowl, Room 209)

6:30 – 8 p.m.
Tim’m West Keynote: “Deconstructing Dis/ease: The Body as a Politicized Site for Healing Self and Community” Gist Hall Theater

Tuesday, Nov. 5

1 p.m.
The Green Movement is Not White (Library Fishbowl, Room 209)

3 p.m.
Poor Whites and the paradox of Privilege, (Library Fishbowl, Room 209)

3 p.m.
Four Directions Intergenerational Youth Exchange: The Next Generation of Environmental Justice Fighters (Sci A Rm. 564)

5 p.m.
Criminality of Blackness: Carrying Skittles and Arizona, SciA564

7 p.m.
Athletes on the Auction Block, SciA 564

Wednesday, Nov. 6

5:30 p.m. & 7 p.m.
Tunnel of Oppression (The J)

7 p.m.
Fighting Educational Injustice with Research Opportunities (GH 218)

Thursday, Nov. 7

5 p.m.
Truth Behind Institutionalized Racism (Goodwin Forum, Nelson Hall 102)

6:30 p.m.
Reception for Trystan T. Cotten, Native Forum 7 p.m. Cancelled

7 p.m.
Liberation Psychology, Historical Trauma, and Wellness in Native American Communities (GH 218)
Black Panthers: My Experience (Goodwin Forum, Nelson Hall 102)
[De]constructing HSU as a Post-Racial Campus: Current Realities, Future Prospects (SH 109)
“Hung Jury” by Trystan T. Cotten, sponsored by Psychology Dept.
Liberation Psychology, Historical Trauma, and Wellness in Native American Communities (GH 218)
“Transsexual Men, Genital Surgery, and Cultural Theory” by Trystan T. Cotten, sponsored by Psychology Dept. Cancelled

Friday, Nov. 8

1 p.m.
Contemporary Resegregation in K-12 Education: laws, Statistics and Experiences (GH 218)

3 p.m.
HSU’s Next 100 Years as a “Hispanic Serving Institution”: A Student Success Plan (GH 218)

3 p.m.
CouRaGeouS Conversations: Our Frameworks of Rights and Justice (SH 108)

5 p.m.
Disability Justice and Our Potential for Resistance (GH 218)

7 p.m.
Visions of Abolition (GH 218)

Special Thanks to the Office of the President for supporting this event.

HSU is an AA/EO Institution. This event is wheelchair accessible. Persons who wish to request disability-related accommodations, including sign language interpreters, should contact SDRC at 707.826.4678 or sdrc@humboldt.edu.

Friday, Nov. 1

Dia de los muertos/Day of the Dead

Time Event Location
10 a.m. – Noon

Testimonios as a Call to Action

Testimonio is a denunciation narrative to an audience, in the public sphere. The ultimate goal of giving a testimonio is to intervene in the world in the cause of justice. As an action in itself, it is a call for solidarity and the start of healing and liberating processes.
Presenter: Dr. Marisol Ruiz, Education

Library Fishbowl
3 – 5 p.m.

Fight for Environmental Equality and Justice

This workshop focuses on the intersection of race and environmental issues; discussions will address the challenge of sustaining healthy neighborhood environments in particularly low-income neighborhoods and communities of color. Issues include access to safe water, sanitation, and access to open space. The sociological lens will be placed on the mainstream environmental movement, ecofeminism and environmental degradation in developing nations.
Presenters: Bianca Castillo and Julie Lovich

SH 108
3 – 5 p.m.
6 – 11 p.m.

Altar Presentation
Dia de los muertos/Day of the Dead

Día de los Muertos/Day of the Dead is a time to gather family and friends to celebrate the lives of those who have passed. You are invited to participate and join MEChA in our presentation of various themed Altares representing the deaths affecting our communities today, we will then migrate to the Native American Forum starting at 6 to enjoy live music, spoken word, crafts/activities and important information regarding the commemorative event. Refreshments will be provided by Los Bagels

Karshner Lounge
Native Forum

Monday, Nov. 4

Time Event Location
1 p.m. –2:30 p.m.

Reading and Q & A with Tim’m West Reading/Q & A/Book Release Party

Poet and hip hop artist Tim’m T. West will read from his books.

Library Fishbowl, Room 209
6:30 – 8 p.m.

Tim’m West Keynote: Deconstructing Dis/ease: The Body as a Politicized Site for Healing Self and Community

In "Deconstructing Dis/ease: The Body as a Politicized Site for the Healing of Self and Community," Tim'm West explores the value of creative productions like his latest CD project Snapshots and the 2nd Edition of Red Dirt Revival: a poetic memoir in 6 Breaths as the creative embodiment of struggle around which community is formed. If body fighting dis/ease must speak, then can its song be as poignant? Is there something about creative forms of expression that has been central to the storytelling of queer activists of color who write and perform through their dis/ease? In the tradition of the late Audre Lorde, Marlon Riggs, Essex Hemphill, and June Jordan, Tim'm explores a critical link between urgency and bravery in his own "body" of work.

Tim'm T. West is a poet, scholar, rapper, and youth activist who was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, and raised primarily in rural Arkansas. A contemporary Renaissance man, he is a featured voice in many documentaries about hip hop and masculinity because of his ground-breaking work as a gay-identified hip hop artist, AIDS activist, and youth advocate, among other affiliations. A teacher and cultural producer at a number of secondary and post-secondary institutions, as well as a former varsity basketball coach, West has a B.A. from Duke University and graduate degrees from The New School for Social Research and Stanford University. He is author of several books (Red Dirt Revival: a poetic memoir in 6 Breaths, BARE: notes from a porchdweller, Flirting, and the forthcoming pre|dispositions), is widely anthologized, and also has produced and released nine hip hop albums, the first several with iconic queer rap group D/DC. In 2013 he released his fifth solo project, Snapshots. Tim'm West travels and lectures widely and, professionally, serves as Director of Youth Programs at Center On Halsted in Chicago.

Gist Hall Theater

Tuesday, Nov. 5

Time Event Location
1 p.m. – 3 p.m.

The Green Movement is Not White

The Green Movement, or Environmental Movement, is seen mostly as a "white movement." We do not normally associate the green movement with environmental racism or (in)justice. This workshop will talk about how the green movement affects people, barriers and possible strategies to get people of color more engaged in the environmental justice movement.
Presenter: Gier Hernandez

Library Fishbowl, Room 209
3 p.m. – 5 p.m.

Poor Whites and the paradox of Privilege

This talk focuses on the way we DON'T talk about poverty in the U.S. Poor white folk are the largest poverty group in the country, yet they are seldom presented in the media or in conversations about marginalization. My work looks at how poor whites carve out their paradoxical identity within the glowing assumption of white privilege.
Presenter: Dr. Kirby Moss, Journalism

Library Fishbowl, Room 209
3 p.m. - 5 p.m.

Four Directions Intergenerational Youth Exchange: The Next Generation of Environmental Justice Fighters

This workshop will highlight the work of Los Jardines Institute's Four Directions Intergenarational Youth Exchange (4DIYE), a grassroots organizing training institute, focusing on environmental social and economic justice, for youth involved in local campaigns to fight environmental racism. Youth from Illinois, Texas, New Mexico and California spent two weeks learning about and working on local environmental justice projects across New Mexico. The workshop will share the youth training model and testimonies from the youth who participated in the exchange.
Presenter: Dr. Cesar Abarca, Social Work

Sci A Rm. 564
5 p.m. - 7 p.m.

Criminality of Blackness: Carrying Skittles and Arizona

The “Not-Guilty” verdict of George Zimmerman in the Trayvon Martin trial sparked nationwide rallies of protest against the verdict. Thus the members of the Black Student Union want to open this conversation to give public space to our voices regarding the verdict. Many of our members are the “Trayon Martins” right here in Humboldt County.
Presenters: Terrevia Shirley and Lomika Purdy

SciA 564
7 p.m. - 9 p.m.

Athletes on the Auction Block

Analyze the racialization processes of Black male athletes in popular culture. Producers and comedians Key and Peele address the way modern athleticsis lending to the process/institution of domestic colonization by way of labor exploitation of young black Americans, and Otherizing these athletes by presenting them as a foreign culture with non-American/non-traditional names.

SciA 564

Wednesday, Nov. 6

Time Event Location
5:30 – 7 p.m. and 7 – 8:30 p.m.,

Tunnel of Oppression

Tunnel of Oppression is an interactive event that guides participants through a series of scenes that aim to educate and challenge them to think more deeply about issues of oppression, privilege and power. Participants are given the opportunity to intervene and address oppression in the scenes, and discuss the issues presented and strategies for disrupting oppression in real life situations.
Presenters: Housing and Dining Services and the Resident Housing Association

The J
7 p.m. – 9 p.m.

Fighting Educational Injustice with Research Opportunities

This workshop will feature a display of various research projects by HSU students, an open discussion about the benefits/challenges of being a student of color pursuing research on campus and in the community, and information about how such research opportunities can make school more affordable and accessible.
Presenters: Dr. Bruce O’Gara, Biological Sciences, Michelle Hameed

Gist Hall 218

Thursday, Nov. 7

Time Event Location
5 p.m. – 7 p.m.

Truth Behind Institutionalized Racism

My research is about education (in)justice in the Los Angeles school district. My research focuses on factors influencing the decreasing test scores and performance levels of African American and Latino students. As vice-president of the African American Mentor Society at Santa Monica High School, I worked on a project that was concerned with micro-agressions in the education system. This project shares my findings.
Presenter: Jamila-Aminat Salihu

Goodwin Forum, Nelson Hall 102
6:30 p.m. – 7 p.m.

Reception for Trystan T. Cotten - Cancelled

Trystan T. Cotten is a, professor of Gender and African American Studies at CSU Stanislaus.

Native Forum
7 p.m. – 9 p.m.

Keynote with Trystan T. Cotten - Cancelled
Transsexual Men, Genital Surgery, and Cultural Theory

Trystan T. Cotten is Associate Professor of Gender and African American Studies at California State University, Stanislaus. He has published five books and numerous articles in journals and book collections, and travels extensively around the world lecturing on transgender issues. His primary areas of research are: 1) transgender medicine and gender identity/embodiment; and 2) nonconforming gender and sexuality in the Africa(n) diaspora. Dr. Cotten's most recent publications are: Hung Jury: Testimonies of Genital Surgery by Transsexual Men and Transgender Migrations: The Bodies, Borders, and Politics of Transition. He is also the principal architect and managing editor of Transgress Press, which is a social entrepreneurial publishing firm devoted to empowering trans people and communities.

Native Forum (contact Melinda Myers, Psychology)
7 p.m. – 9 p.m.

Liberation Psychology, Historical Trauma, and Wellness in Native American Communities

Dominant psychological theory and practice can re-traumatize Native Americans by privileging Euro-American values and definitions of health and healing, leading to internalized oppression and emotional numbing. Liberation psychology argues that that mental health “symptoms” stem from social inequity and injustice rather than individual pathology. This workshop will explore a liberatory path towards healing in the Native community using critical consciousness, empowerment, connection to cultural strengths, and socio-political action.
Presenter: Francesca Parker, Counseling & Psychological Services

Gist Hall 218
7 p.m. – 9 p.m.

Black Panthers: My Experience

Just as Common stated in “A Song for Assata,” I asked myself what I would do if I were in place of Assata Shakur or Elaine Brown. My presentation will connect my participation in the Trayvon Martin justice rally, July 14, 2013, on Crenshaw with Black Panther activists. My focus is on Black youth activism today and the role of Afrocentrism.
Presenter: Denita Turner

Goodwin Forum, Nelson Hall 102

Friday, Nov. 8

Time Event Location
1 p.m. – 3 p.m.

Contemporary Resegregation in K-12 Education: laws, Statistics and Experiences

In this workshop Kindra Aschenbrenner will lead a discussion around post- modern educational trends in the United States. Workshop will focus on student lived experiences and relations with school options (private, public, charter, transferring); laws and court rulings; and statistical trends in the racial makeup of our educational institutions. Discussion will be framed by Bonilla-Silva’s theory of “Colorblind Racism”.
Presenter: Kindra Aschenbrenner

GH 218
3 p.m. – 5 p.m.

HSU’s Next 100 Years as a “Hispanic Serving Institution”: A Student Success Plan

HSU was recently promoted to the status of "Hispanic Serving Institution" within the CSU system. This workshop will deconstruct this new title and lend insight as to what this means for students, faculty and staff of HSU now and over the next 100 years. Specifically, this dialogue on race will consider the increasing social responsibilities attached to the campus and its community, including: the roles of language and bilingualism, cross-cultural awareness, and community building. Subtopics of this dialogue may include student services, success, and retention.
Presenter: Julie Raich, Russell Gaskell, World Languages and Cultures, and Dorian Romeo

GH 218
3 p.m. – 5 p.m.

CouRaGeouS Conversations: Our Frameworks of Rights and Justice

What are rights and justice? Are they the same, or different, and what does that question say about our visions of community and social change? This workshop is a discussion space where we can define our hopes for a more just world in coalition with one another, at the complex intersections of our lives. Everyone brings knowledge and questions to this space, and everyone is welcome.
Presenters: CouRaGeous Club

SH 108
5 p.m. – 7 p.m.

Disability Justice and Our Potential for Resistance

Why don't we talk about disability? This is a workshop and discussion space where we can connect disability to our visions of a social justice movement that recognizes the intersections of our experiences and the complexities of our lives. Everyone welcome!
Presenter: Elizabeth Hassler

GH 218
5 p.m. – 7 p.m.

Artists from The Indigenous Arts Coalition present: "post contemporary"

Reception for "post contemporary" by The Indigenous Arts Coalition
The Indigenous Arts Coalition from the San Francisco Bay Area, an evolving group of culturally and artistically diverse artists identifying as indigenous, are featured at Humboldt State University’s Goudi’ni Gallery in Artists from The Indigenous Arts Coalition present: “post contemporary,”November 8 through December 5, 2013.

Goudi’ni Gallery
7 p.m. – 9 p.m.

Film Screening and Discussion
Visions of Abolition

A screening of the film Vision of Abolition about the prison industrial complex and prison abolition movement. Featuring Critical Resistance and Incite! Women of Color Against Violence, the film connects the movement to the 19th century slavery abolition movement, and examines how race, class and gender inform the ways in which this country's prison system is run. Discussion will follow.
Presenters: Brandy Lara &, Ankush Ganapathy

GH 218