Rights & Responsibilities

You have the right to ask a school:

  • what it costs to attend, and what its refund policies are if you drop out;
  • how the school determines whether you are making satisfactory academic progress, and what happens if you are not;
  • what financial help is available, including information on federal, state, and school financial aid programs;
  • what the deadlines are for submitting applications for each of the financial aid programs available; and what criteria are used to select financial aid recipients;
  • how individual financial need is determined. This process includes how costs for tuition and fees, room and board, transportation, books and supplies, personal and miscellaneous expenses, etc., are considered in your budget;
  • what resources (such as parental contribution, other financial aid, personal assets, etc.) are considered in the need calculation; and how much of your financial need, as determined by the school, has been met;
  • to explain the various programs in your financial aid package and how and when you will receive your aid.
  • If you believe you have been treated unfairly, you may request reconsideration of the award;
  • what portion of your financial aid must be repaid, and what portion is grant aid. If the aid is a loan, you have the right to know the interest rate, the total amount that must be repaid, payback procedures, the length of time you have to repay the loan, and when repayment is to begin;
  • how to apply for additional financial aid if your financial circumstances change resulting in increased need;
  • to disclose the percentage of its students who complete the school's programs and the percentage who transfer out and job placement rates
  • about the effect outside scholarships may have on your financial aid award; and
  • for its statistics on crimes committed on and off campus, and for its campus safety policies and procedures.

You have the responsibility to:

  • review and consider all information about a school's program before enrolling;
  • compare your anticipated monthly student loan payment and other expenses, to your expected take-home pay after college.
  • complete the financial aid application accurately and submit it on time to the right place. Errors delay aid. Intentional misrepresentation on an application for federal financial aid is a violation of law and a criminal offense subject to penalties.
  • talk to high school counselors, local employers, and current and former students to find out how they liked the school.
  • respond promptly and return all requested additional documentation, verification, corrections, and/or new information to the Financial Aid Office or appropriate agency;
  • read, understand, accept responsibility for and keep copies of all forms and agreements you sign;
  • if you have loans, notify the school and the lender(s) of changes in your name, permanent mailing address, marital or enrollment status;
  • notify the Office of Admissions of any changes in your name, or mailing address; notify the Financial Aid Office of changes in marital, enrollment, or attendance status;
  • perform in a satisfactory manner the work that is agreed upon in accepting a Federal or State Work Study award;
  • know and comply with the deadlines for application or reapplication for aid, and with the school's refund procedures;
  • maintain satisfactory academic progress according to the school's policies and standards;
  • report the receipt of all resources not considered in evaluating your eligibility, including full or partial payment of Humboldt tuition and fees by outside agencies;
  • complete a withdrawal form at the Financial Aid Office if you officially or unofficially withdraw, or cease attending classes, during a semester;
  • repay any Title IV billings prior to release of current academic year aid;
  • repay your student loans, even if you don't complete your education, don't get a job, or are not happy with your education. Some lenders now offer incentives for borrowers who repay their loans on time;
  • file for a deferment or forbearance, or change repayment plans, if you are at risk of default
  • complete entrance counseling before you receive your first loan disbursement - and exit counseling before you leave school.