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Dr. Steven R. Martin

Professor, Natural Resources Recreation
Department Chair, ESM Department
Graduate Faculty

What I like about HSU is the sense of community and shared ideals and the feeling that people are here because they want to make things better . . . the environment, their communities. When I teach a class it’s my favorite part of the day. I look forward to going into the classroom because I enjoy having that discussion, that intellectual give and take, about a topic in which we all share an interest.

My teaching and professional interests include park and wilderness planning and management, particularly planning for and managing recreational uses of parks, wilderness, and similar public lands. My personal interests and hobbies include whitewater kayaking and rafting, hiking and backpacking, cross-country skiing, and visiting our great public lands. My favorite landscapes to visit are the Colorado Plateau deserts of southern Utah and the high mountain lakes and forests of western Montana and the high Sierra. The two books that have most influenced me are A Sand County Almanac, by Aldo Leopold, and Desert Solitaire, by Edward Abbey.

Contact Information
Education
B.S. in both Biology and Environmental Studies, 1982, Principia College, Illinois
M.S. in Wildland Recreation Management, 1987, The University of Montana, Missoula, Montana
Ph.D. in Forestry (recreation), 1994, The University of Montana, Missoula, Montana
Courses Taught
EMP 105 – Natural Resources Conservation
EMP 215 – Natural Resources and Recreation
EMP 415 – Recreation Planning
EMP 440 – Managing Recreation Visitors
FOR 374 – Wilderness Area Management
Research Interests

My research focuses on visitor use of recreation settings and managing recreational use of natural resource areas, particularly parks, wilderness areas and similar public lands. As such, my research is best characterized as “human dimensions of natural resources” and involves quite a bit of social science, though in a natural resources context.

Publications

Martin, Steven and Daniel White. 2013. Headwaters Forest Reserve 2012 Visitor Study. Final Research Report submitted to the Bureau of Land Management, Arcata Field Office. June 30, 2013. 204 pp.

Martin, Steven and Jessica Blackwell. 2012. Sequoia & Kings Canyon National Parks 2011 Wilderness Visitor Survey. Final Research Report submitted to Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute and Sequoia-Kings Canyon National Parks. 129 pp.

Martin, Steven and Kristen Pope. 2012. The Influence of Hand-Held Information and Communication Technology on Visitor Perceptions of Risk and Risk-Related Behavior. In: Cole, David N., comp. 2012. Wilderness visitor experiences: Progress in research and management; 2011 April 4-7; Missoula, MT. Proc. RMRS-P-66. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 219 p.

Douglas, Ross, Martin, and Van Kirk. 2012. Overnight Visitor Use and Computer Simulation Modeling of the Yosemite Wilderness. Pages 84-89 in: Weber, Samantha, ed. 2012. Rethinking Protected Areas in a Changing World: Proceedings of the 2011 George Wright Society Biennial Conference on Parks, Protected Areas, and Cultural Sites. Hancock, Michigan: The George Wright Society.

Van Kirk, Martin, Ross, and Douglas. 2011. Simulation Modeling and Analysis of Overnight Visitor Use of the Yosemite Wilderness. Final Report to National Park Service, Yosemite National Park, El Portal, California. November 2011. 89 pages.

Ward, Martin, Taylor. 2011. Design and Evaluation of Communication Strategies to Mitigate Visitor Use Impacts at Pelican and Cormorant Non-breeding Sites. Final research report submitted to Bureau of Land Management and U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Arcata, CA. 72 pp.

Pope, Kristen and Steven Martin. 2011. Visitor perceptions of technology, risk and rescue in wilderness. International Journal of Wilderness, volume 17, number 2, pages 19 - 26, 48.

Ward, Taylor, and Martin. 2011. Evaluation of Communication Strategies to Mitigate Visitor Use Impacts on Marbled Murrelets. Final Research Report submitted to Redwood National and State Parks. July 2011.

Martin, Steven and Kate McCurdy. 2010. Wilderness food storage: Are bear-resistant food storage canisters effective? International Journal of Wilderness, volume 16, number 1, pages 13-19, April 2010.

Martin, Steven and Kate McCurdy. 2009. Wilderness food storage in Yosemite: Using the Theory of Planned Behavior to understand backpacker canister use. Human Dimensions of Wildlife, volume 14, number 3, pages 206-218, June 2009.

Martin, Steven, Jeff Marsolais, and David Rolloff. 2009. Visitor perceptions of appropriate management actions across the Recreation Opportunity Spectrum. Journal of Park and Recreation Administration, volume 27, number 1, pages 56-69, Spring 2009.

Martin, Steven and Kate McCurdy. 2008. Wilderness food storage in Yosemite: understanding backpacker canister use. Paper presented at Integrating Human Dimensions into Fisheries and Wildlife Management Conference, Estes Park, CO, Sept. 28 - Oct. 2, 2008.

McCurdy, Kate and Steven Martin. 2007. An assessment of bear-resistant food canister use in Yosemite National Park. Final report submitted to the National Park Service.

Martin, Steven, Kate McCurdy and Steve Thompson. 2006. Backcountry food storage: How not to share your dinner with a bear. Research poster presented at 11th International Symposium on Society and Resource Management, Vancouver, B.C. June 2006.

Martin, Steven, Kate McCurdy and Tori Seher. 2005. Food storage regulations in the Yosemite Wilderness: implications for bears and backpackers. Research poster presented at the 8th World Wilderness Congress, Anchorage, Alaska. October 2005.

Martin, Steven and Emily Harris. 2004. Campsite solitude: A contingent valuation study. Research poster presented at 10 th International Symposium on Society and Resource Management, Keystone, Colorado. June 2004.

Martin, Steven and Jeff Marsolais. 2004. Visitor perceptions of management actions across the recreation opportunity spectrum. Research poster presented at 10 th International Symposium on Society and Resource Management, Keystone, Colorado. June 2004.

Martin, Steven and Emily Harris. 2004. Research Report for Lost Coast Trail Backcountry Visitor Study. Report submitted to Bureau of Land Management, King Range National Conservation Area.

Martin, Steven, John Stuart, Portia Halbert, and Mark Rizzardi. 2004. Effect of 70 years of recreational car camping on vigor of old-growth coast redwood and Douglas-fir. Research report submitted to Big Basin Redwoods State Park, and research poster presented at Redwood Region Forestry Science Symposium, March 2004. Rohnert Park, CA.

Martin, Steven and Emily Harris. 2004. Are bear-proof food storage canisters being used effectively on the Lost Coast Trail? Research poster presented at 4th Social Aspects and Recreation Research Symposium, February 4-6, 2004. San Francisco, CA.

Duncan, Garrett and Steven Martin. 2002. Comparing the effectiveness of interpretive and sanction messages for influencing wilderness visitors’ intended behavior. International Journal of Wilderness 8(2): 20-25.

Martin, Steven and Carolyn Widner. 2000. Research Report for Headwaters Forest Reserve Visitor Study. Report submitted to Bureau of Land Management, Arcata Resource Area.

Martin, Steven. 2000. Donations as an alternative to wilderness user fees - The case of the Desolation Wilderness. In: Cole, McCool, Borrie, and O’Laughlin (compilers). Wilderness Science in a Time of Change Conference Proceedings, Volume Four, pp. 142-147. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station.

Martin, Steven. 1999. A policy implementation analysis of the Recreation Fee Demonstration Program: Convergence of public sentiment, agency programs, and policy principles? Journal of Park and Recreation Administration 17(3): 15-34.

Martin, Steven. 1999. A Wilderness Within: The Life of Sigurd F. Olson (Reviewed). Leisure Sciences 21(2): 167-169.

Martin, Steven. 1997. Specialization and differences in setting preferences among wildlife viewers. Human Dimensions of Wildlife. 2(1): 1-18.