applied anthropology in action
Class Schedule ← Master of Arts in Applied Anthropology

Class Schedule

Fall Semester 2014

Fall 2014 Key dates:

  • July 14 – July 18: Registration
  • August 8: Fall fees due (see your online Student Center)
  • August 25: Instruction begins
  • September 24: Last day to set enrollment for financial aid disbursement
  • November 11: Veteran’s Day holiday observed
  • November 24-28: Fall break
  • December 15-19: Final exams week
  • See CEEE Deadline Calendar

Fall 2014 Courses:
Note: After the Summer Institute, students will choose to continue as either full-time or part-time.
 
ANTH 672 Theory in Applied Anthropology (3 units) (all 1st year full-time students)
Explores con­nec­tions between the the­ory and prac­tice of address­ing human prob­lems in imme­di­ate and con­crete set­tings. Students develop the capac­ity to crit­i­cally eval­u­ate and effec­tively com­mu­ni­cate about prob­lems and inter­ac­tions between humans and their environments.
*Required Textbook: Ervin, A. 2005. Applied anthropology: Tools and perspectives for contemporary practice, 2nd Edition. Boston: Allyn and Bacon. Please order online (will not be placed in the campus bookstore). This text is available on Amazon and elsewhere online.

ANTH 673 Anthropology in Practice (3 units) (all 1st year students)
In-depth survey of domains in which anthropological principles, theories, and methods are applied. Special attention to potential markets/opportunities and proactively marketing professional level anthropological skills. Students will also study professional aspects of anthropology such as teamwork/managerial strategies, non-thesis project management, and office/production skills. Students apply their skills by developing a portfolio, managing a strategic project, and by arranging the field placement (internship) they will be engaged in during Anth 675 the following semester.
*Required Textbook: Nolan, R.W. 2013. A handbook of practicing anthropology. Madison, MA: Wiley-Blackwell. This text is a freely available as an ebook from the HSU library  If you wish to purchase a hard copy (not required), you can do so online (e.g., Amazon).
*Required Textbook: Schmidt, T. 2009. Strategic project management made simple: Practical tools for leaders and teams. Hookton, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Please order online (will not be placed in the campus bookstore). This text is available on Amazon and elsewhere online.

ANTH 678 Applied Anthropology Pro Seminar (1 unit) (all 1st year students)
Ongoing seminar/colloquium for the MA cohort. Focuses on research in progress, devel­op­ing argu­ments and writ­ten and oral pre­sen­ta­tions within a struc­tured and super­vised format. Students present and dis­cuss their ongo­ing research and writ­ing and engage in peer review. Faculty also inter­mit­tently sched­ule read­ings and dis­cus­sions based on top­ics rel­e­vant to cohort research inter­ests, insti­tu­tional place­ments or field­work con­texts, eth­i­cal issues, devel­op­ments in the dis­ci­pline and rel­e­vant global events.
*Required Textbook: Hurst, M. 2007. Bit literacy: Productivity in the age of information and e-mail overload. New York: Good Experience Press. Please order online (will not be placed in the campus bookstore). This text is available on Amazon and elsewhere online.

ANTH 679 Applied Anthropology Region: Australia (3 units) (all 1st year full-time students take this course or their outside elective)
Students will be introduced to the wide array of applied anthropology projects within the Australian context and the multiple sub-fields of Anthropology in which they are situated. Examining the ecological, historical, economic and political forces at work in this regional context will reveal the connections between these forces and the extent to which they shape the attention that problems receive. There are communities whose livelihoods and health are impacted by multiple areas of concern and it is crucial that applied anthropologists have a deep, critical and holistic appreciation of the complexities of their work contexts.
*Required Textbook: Altman, J., and Hilkson, M. 2010. Culture crisis: Anthropology and politics in aboriginal Australia. Sydney, NSW: University of New South Wales Press. This text is a freely available as an ebook from the HSU library If you wish to purchase a hard copy (not required), you can do so online (e.g., Amazon).
*Required Textbook: Moreton-Robinson, A. (ed). 2008. Sovereign subjects: Indigenous sovereignty matters. Crows Nest, NSW: Allen & Unwin. Please order online (will not be placed in the campus bookstore). This text is available on Amazon and elsewhere online.

Fall 2014 Notes:

  • Fall 2014 enrollment information will be provided prior to the registration date.
  • All Fall 2014 MA Applied Anth courses above are online. The online coursework will be primarily asynchronous, meaning that there will be due dates and deadlines, but students will have flexibility in planning days and times to view course materials/lectures and complete assignments. Students are not required to be on campus, but those who would like to are welcomed and will have access to departmental facilities and can form student study groups…
  • If you wish to take non-program courses at HSU (e.g., for your outside elective), you will need to register using the Open University policy. MA students are encouraged to contact course instructors prior to the beginning of the term to inform the instructor of their interest in the course and inquire if a spot may be held. For more information on current HSU non-program courses, see the HSU Catalog and the HSU class schedule.

Spring Semester 2015

Spring 2015 Key dates:

  • Dates TBA: Registration
  • Dates TBA: Spring fees due (see your online Student Center)
  • Jan 20, 2015: Instruction begins
  • Feb, exact date TBA: Last day to set enrollment for financial aid disbursement
  • Mar 16-20: Spring break
  • Mar 31: Cesar Chavez Holiday observed
  • May 11-15: Final exams week
  • See CEEE Deadline Calendar

Spring 2015 Courses:
Note: Please contact the graduate coordinator and your advisor if you wish to change from full-time to part-time.

ANTH 674 Project Design & Management (3 units) (all 1st year full-time students)
Guided preparation of research proposals and/or grant applications, with a focus on student initiative and responsibility. Theoretical and methodological topics include defining questions, designing fieldwork, proposal evaluation criteria, and peer-review. At the end of the course, students will present their completed project proposal to the course instructor(s) and their thesis committee for approval.
*Required Textbook: TBA

ANTH 675 Field Placement (3 units) (all 1st year students)
Students are required to complete 180 internship hours at one or more advisor-approved locations that provide learning/training relevant to your thesis or career path. The purpose of the field placement (internship) is to engage students with the work of relevant institutions to enhance students’ knowledge of sources, research methodologies, institutional cultures, and work environments. During the internship, students will learn and critically evaluate not only aspects of the position and particular organization, but also their roles and responsibilities as anthropologists. With advisor approval, field schools may be used to fulfill all or part of the internship hours. Internships may start as early as the first fall semester (after the Summer Institute). Internship hours should begin no later than the first spring semester in the MA program, unless a solid plan is in place to complete the hours during the directly proceeding summer. All students enroll in Anth 675 during their first Spring semester in the MA program regardless if the internship spans before or after the Spring semester. If an internship begins prior to enrollment in Anth 675 (before the Spring semester), students should contact the graduate coordinator and their advisor to ensure they are enrolled in the ANTH 675 Moodle to obtain necessary assignments that must be completed during the internship.
*Required Textbook: No textbooks required.

ANTH 678 Applied Anthropology Pro Seminar (1 unit) (all 1st year full-time students)
Ongoing seminar/colloquium for the MA cohort. Focuses on research in progress, devel­op­ing argu­ments and writ­ten and oral pre­sen­ta­tions within a struc­tured and super­vised format. Students present and dis­cuss their ongo­ing research and writ­ing and engage in peer review. Faculty also inter­mit­tently sched­ule read­ings and dis­cus­sions based on top­ics rel­e­vant to cohort research inter­ests, insti­tu­tional place­ments or field­work con­texts, eth­i­cal issues, devel­op­ments in the dis­ci­pline and rel­e­vant global events.
*Required Textbook: TBA

Elective Course, Topic TBA (3 units) (all 1st year full-time students take this course or their outside elective)
Description TBA
*Required Textbook: TBA

Spring 2015 Notes:

  • Spring 2015 enrollment information will be provided prior to the registration date.
  • All Spring 2015 MA Applied Anth courses above are online. The online coursework will be primarily asynchronous, meaning that there will be due dates and deadlines, but students will have flexibility in planning days and times to view course materials/lectures and complete assignments. Students are not required to be on campus, but those who would like to are welcomed and will have access to departmental facilities and can form student study groups…
  • If you wish to take non-program courses at HSU (e.g., for your outside elective), you will need to register using the Open University policy. MA students are encouraged to contact course instructors prior to the beginning of the term to inform the instructor of their interest in the course and inquire if a spot may be held. For more information on current HSU non-program courses, see the HSU Catalog and the HSU class schedule.

Summer Institute 2015

Summer 2015 Key dates:

  • May, dates TBA: Registration (students will be automatically enrolled)
  • Dates TBA: Summer Institute fees due (see your online Student Center)
  • June 1, 2015: Moodle site becomes available to view online preparatory coursework
  • June 30, 2015: Last day to file a FAFSA
  • July 4-8, 2015: Online coursework due – please see Moodle for details beginning June 1
  • July 11-Aug 8, 2015: On-Campus Summer Institute
  • August 8: Final day of instruction
  • See CEEE Deadline Calendar and Schedule-at-a-Glance below.

Summer 2015 Courses:

ANTH 670 Introduction to Applied Anthropology (2 units)
Introduction to the anthro­po­log­i­cal per­spec­tives, meth­ods, the­o­ries and prac­tices applied to human and envi­ron­men­tal prob­lems in aca­d­e­mic, pro­fes­sional and global contexts. Students begin thinking about future research and career trajectories.
*Required Textbook: Nolan, R.W. 2013. A handbook of practicing anthropology. Madison, MA: Wiley-Blackwell. This text is a freely available as an ebook from the HSU library http://library.calstate.edu/humboldt/books/record?id=847679 If you wish to purchase a hard copy (not required), you can do so online (e.g., Amazon).

ANTH 671 Methods in Applied Anthropology (3 units)
Intensive study of research methods and materials used within biological, archaeological, and cultural anthropology. Topics include ethnographic data collection, structured obser­va­tion, inter­view­ing, materials/artifact/skeletal analy­sis, and man­age­ment of data. Most top­ics will be cov­ered as a group to pro­vide a broad skill-base in the discipline. Some requirements will be specific to field of interest.
*Note: No required textbooks. Electronic reading supplements will be provided.

All incoming first-year students that have accepted admissions in the Student Center will be automatically enrolled during the week of May 19th in both courses the Summer Institute courses (Anth 670 & 671). Fees for Summer Institute will be $1875 plus any additional fees related to individual housing and travel choices. Due dates for Summer Institute fees will be announced by Spring 2015; students expecting a financial aid award for the Summer may be able to request a fee deferment from the College of eLearning and Extended Education (CEEE) if necessary to arrange payment at a later date before the Summer Institute. Please inquire at the CEEE Office (Student Business Services, 2nd floor), or call (707) 826-3731.

Summer Institute 2015 Class Schedule-At-a-Glance:

Online Prep Work:

  • June 1: Online coursework becomes available
  • July 4-8: Online assignments due

Week 1, On-Campus:

  • July 11 (Saturday): 10:00am-5:00pm (bring Research Presentation PowerPoint); Welcome din­ner 6:00pm

Week 2, On-Campus:

  • July 12 (Sunday): 8:00am-5:00pm
  • July 13 (Monday): 1:00-5:00pm
  • July 14 (Tuesday): 12:00-5:00pm
  • July 16 (Thursday): 1:00-5:00pm
  • July 17 (Friday): 10:00-5:00pm
  • July 18 (Saturday): 8:00am-6:00pm

Week 3, On-Campus:

  • July 20 (Monday): 1:00-5:00pm
  • July 21 (Tuesday): 12:00-5:00pm
  • July 23 (Thursday): 1:00-5:00pm
  • July 24 (Friday): 1:00-5:00pm
  • July 25 (Saturday): 8:00am-6:00pm

Week 4, On-Campus:

  • July 27 (Monday): 1:00-5:00pm
  • July 28 (Tuesday): 1:00-5:00pm
  • July 30 (Thursday): 10:00-5:00pm
  • July 31 (Friday): 1:00-5:00pm
  • Aug 1 (Saturday): 8:00am-6:00pm

Week 5, On-Campus:

  • Aug 3 (Monday): 12:00-6:00pm
  • Aug 4 (Tuesday): 12:00-6:00pm
  • Aug 6 (Thursday): 10:00-5:00pm
  • Aug 7 (Friday): 12:00-5:00pm
  • Aug 8 (Saturday): 10:00am-5:00pm; Farewell recep­tion din­ner 6:00pm

Summer Institute Schedule Notes:

  • Plan to be in class dur­ing the times listed above. Classes meet ini­tially at BSS 310 unless oth­er­wise indi­cated. There will be approx­i­mately 10 min­utes of break time per hour of class time. On longer days, there will also be a 30-60 minute lunch break.
  • Expect at least 20 hours per week out-of-class stu­dent work (e.g., read­ing, research, writ­ing, lab work). Some of this time will be struc­tured group / indi­vid­ual work that requires a coor­di­nated sched­ule with other stu­dents, whereas other work will be flex­i­ble in tim­ing. There will be no required student-faculty meet­ings other than as shown in the above sched­ule, unless advanced notice is given.
  • A more detailed sched­ule and course infor­ma­tion will be pro­vided prior to the begin­ning of the Summer Institute. After you are registered, you will be able to access this information on by logging into Moodle

Are you wondering what you can do to prepare for the Summer Institute?

A great (and exciting) way to start the program on track would be to start thinking about the topic that you would like to explore for your MA thesis! You may have already identified a specific topic/project in your statement of purpose, or you may still be refining your ideas. Please take some time prior to the Summer Institute to consider research areas you are interested in. When coming up with ideas, it might help to briefly list for each: (1) Your questions/hypotheses; (2) What methods could address your questions; (3) What elective courses/internship experiences might be useful for such a project; and (4) If the project could be completed within a reasonable timeframe. You do not need to have your thesis topic solidified prior to beginning the program, but it will be useful to have a strong idea of what direction you are heading, and some potential thesis ideas on hand. Have fun with this!

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