Belize Field Program

Students at the Belize Archaeology Field Program


Costa Rica Field School 2008

Dr. Glenn and students observing monkeys at La Selva, Costa Rica


Mona monkey skull

Mona monkey skull used in teaching and research


Skeletal specimen

Specimen from the skeletal collections at our labs


Spider monkeys

Spider monkeys at La Selva, Costa Rica


Study abroad in Tibet

Study abroad in Tibet


Alisha Gaskins

Former student Alisha Gaskins completing a facial reconstruction


San Nicolas

Melinda Salisbury and Laura Monterrosa measuring pit depth at San Nicolas


Aten Temple-Tell el Amarna

small Aten Temple-Tell el Amarna


West Africa Magnuson monkeys

Former Graduate student Lindsay Magnuson tracking monkeys in West Africa


Anthropology student

Anthropology student


Student Making Peanut Butter in Bolivia

Erin Wheelis making peanut butter, Bolivia Peace Corps


Dai Sun Xian Ceremony

Dai Suan xian ceremony


Anthropology Student dancing in field in
Burma

Anthropology students immersed in the Grenadian culture


Dai Dinner

Dai Dinner


Howling monkeys

Howling monkeys at La Selva, Costa Rica


Costa Rica Field School 2008

Students in San Jose, Costa Rica, at the end of the Costa Rica Primate Field Program


Costa Rica Field School 2008

Students at the Costa Rica Primate Field Program


Belize Field School

Dr. Cortes-Rincon and students at the Belize Archaeology Field Program


Costa Rica Field School 2008

Students observing monkeys at La Selva, Costa Rica


Once you’ve developed your fundamental skills, you’ll have the opportunity to focus on the subjects that interest you most by specializing in one of the following five areas:

Archaeological Anthropology: Uncovering and interpreting humanity’s history and evolution by unearthing and analyzing historical remains.

Cultural Anthropology: Investigating ways humans organize themselves, what constitutes meaning and value, and how material and intellectual resources are allocated.

Linguistic Anthropology: Examining the history, evolution, and internal structure of human languages, and considering the relationship between language and culture.

Biological Anthropology: Tracing the biological origins, evolution and genetic variation of humankind; studying the fossil record and current-day remains of humans (forensic anthropology); and surveying the diversity and adaptations of non-human primates (primatology).

Applied Anthropology: Incorporating skills from anthropological disciplines to solve practical problems in fields such as development, healthcare, medical anthropology, education, business and advertising.

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